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Successful Interventions to Reduce Youth Crime - Introduction

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   By: Justin S. N. Boodhoo

   2013-10-01 10:39 PM

The concern about youth involvement in crime is an important issue, considering that in 2010 there were approximately 23% of Canadians who were under the age of 20 (Public Safety Canada, 2012). In this same year, there were 153,000 Canadian youth accused of committing a crime (Public Safety Canada, 2012). From an early age, we are taught that education is an important, necessary, and crucial element to personal development.

As children, we are ushered to learn our letters, numbers, and core elements of a variety of subject matter, which all act as stepping stones to future educational development. As we progress in our biological age, we are also expected to develop through pre-determined educational requirements that will guide us through to our adolescence, with the goal of attaining a high school diploma, and for many, starting the second step in our educational development: post-secondary education.

Considering the fact that for youth, a significant part of their day is mandated for them to be in school until the age of 16, we can examine how youth crime can be reduced, and more specifically, if education has any impact on decreasing youth crime. Especially, seeing that children spent such a significant part of their early years involved in this system aimed to educate, we need to provide social and cognitive stimulation, with the hope of setting up our youth to contribute to society in the future.

In the upcoming series on crime interventions, we will take a look at three interventions that have been researched as effective in reducing youth crime. For the next three weeks, we will explore an intervention that has been proven through research to be effective, highlighting the importance that education, relationships, and literacy play in reducing crime.

References

Public Safety Canada. (2012). A statistical snapshot of youth at risk and youth offending in Canada. Retrieved from http://www.publicsafety.gc.ca/res/cp/res/_fl/ssyr-eng.pdf


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